Tuesday, November 19, 2013

The Name of this Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch

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Why bother?  Warnings will not stop you from reading this anyways.  


There is a perk when a book’s name is secret –we can name it however we like.  Besides, it was written by a person under a false name.  The catch is, since we’ve read it and named it, we also have to share in keeping its secrets. Or not, if we like treading on the edge and dipping a toe in the waters.

The author took his time giving an ample warning on whoever opened this book.  He said that it is for our own safety that we don’t read it at all.  And he never fails interjecting this same warning throughout the story.  It was really very considerate of him, but there’s no stopping a curious reader.   Really.
“Generally speaking, books don't cause much harm. Except when you read them, that is. Then they cause all kinds of problems.”
Our two very unlikely protagonists are Cass and Max-Ernest, both are very peculiar, too. Cass believes herself as a survivalist; she carries a survival-equipped backpack every time, and has a penchant in warning people of any probable (and improbable) danger around.  But for a survivalist, she is quite impulsive.  Meanwhile, Max-Earnest is a chatterbox.  He has a long-winded explanation on why his name is Max-Ernest; and why his parents lives apart in the same house, apparently driving him crazy with their parenting rivalry, which earned him sessions with different shrinks.  And in spite of his poor attempts in humor, he is really smart.  Bosch sure knows how to make his characters extra special.

Their collaboration was born of curiosity and affinity for having no other peers.  Their adventure started with a mysterious box called The Symphony of Smells which was part of the artifacts found in a late magician’s house. Curiosity led them investigating the said house and bumped into our villains, Dr. L and Mrs. Mauvais.  Whatever they are looking for, Cass and Max-Ernest got away with it.  That's not the end of it though, sooner than they expected, these two villains struck again and abducted a boy from their school; Cass then set out for a rescue mission.

I really love the tone of this book, its friendly way of narrating, while being mysterious enough to keep the reader’s attention.  The characters are charming and humorous.  The plot is nothing new, but it still offers something unique and interesting.  I thought that the family sets featured here were great and something we can learn from.  I  recommend this book (and its series) to those of you who like adventures, heroic characters, and solving mysteries.  And even if you are only a third of that, I’m sure you’ll be curious enough to read this.
“For the magician's story, you must have all your wits about you. No wandering minds allowed.”


Book Details:
Publisher:  Little and Brown
Genre:  Children’s Books
Awards:  Pennsylvania Young Readers' Choice Award 2011
Rating:  ★★★★


4 comments :

  1. Oooooh. Cool title! Taking note of this for my next bookstore visit. ;)

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    1. Hi, Lynai. All the books in this series have the strangest titles. Happy hunting! :)

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  2. Will be adding this on my list too! The book seems a bit Lemony Snicket-y too. :)

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    1. Many previous readers did say the same. Very Lemony Snicket-y with less grim. :)

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